Friday, July 03, 2009

Book Review: Tribal Bigfoot by David Paulides, with illustrations by Harvey Pratt

Better than The Hoopa Project!!!

We have all heard how a movie sequel is usually better than the original. The Empire Strikes Back, Godfather II, Transformers II. Well, in books, sometimes a sequel comes along that blows its predecessor away; that has happened with the new book Tribal Bigfoot. Those who read David's excellent original book last year (the Bigfoot Book of the Year 2008) know that there was a good deal of reports from the Hoopa reservation in Northwest California. For Tribal, David revisits the NW part of the Golden State, by going to Del Norte, Siskiyou, Humboldt and Trinity Counties to investigate more reports that have been investigated by him and his team. He also revisits Hoopa by asking the witnesses who did not have sketches done for Project to have the sketches made by Harvey Pratt the famed forensic artist, which they are. But Paulides goes beyond NW California in this book; he also travels to the Sooner State of Oklahoma to interview eyewitnesses, as well as to The Land of 10,000 Lakes, Minnesota. Not only are there witnesses interviewed and sketches drawn of eyewitness accounts, but Paulides also comes to some startling conclusions as to the true nature of the Sasquatch, via DNA tests and just talking to the eyewitnesses and hearing their descriptions. The DNA tests yield some very surprising results, and Dave follows the evidence as he sees it to its conclusions-that Bigfoot is truly more human than ape, and that they have a language, according to reports he has investigated of witnesses hearing what sounds like Native American language coming from the woods, and also hearing from Native American elders that if a Native American speaks to a Sasquatch in their native tongue, the Sasquatch will understand it. I cannot recommend this book highly enough, and give it not 5, not 6, not even 9, but 10 stars!!!!!! Well-done, Dave and Harvey!!!!!!

1 comment:

Philip O'Mara said...

Read a great new romantic comedy following the fortunes of Paul Marriott, the Secretary of the Barnstorm Village Sunday soccer team, and coach of a school cricket team in Yorkshire, England. The story describes the remarkable camaraderie between the players and supporters of this little club and their desire to achieve success. Nonetheless, the team is known more for its antics off the field, rather than their performances on it.

During his time at the club he meets and becomes involved with Emma Potter, who is the sister of James Potter, a major player for their bitter rivals Moortown Inn. Thus, begins an entangled web of romance and conflict. He also begins working at Derry High School, a school with a poor reputation of academic success, where he becomes coach of the school cricket team. Here he develops an amazing relationship with the children and embarks on an epic journey.